Deadly wild boar are exactly how deadly? - California Hunting Post

Deadly wild boar are exactly how deadly?

Advertisements

[two_third]

Notice to readers.

Google violates First amendment by “… abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press;”.

Google found pictures on this page in violation of their Adsense policies. Huh? The pictures Google is suppressing are found in Google search results and on very big websites. 

What our readers like or dislike is not Google’s business. And threatening the freedom of the press by blocking search results is out of bounds.

We need to be advertising alternatives to Google. Google is getting way too big and too influential.

We have removed the pictures Google eyes find offensive but list instead the URL of the picture for your information and use.

https://i2.wp.com/huntingboar.org/b/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/BoarAttackWoundDogimages.jpeg?w=259&ssl=1

https://i0.wp.com/huntingboar.org/b/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/BoarAttackInjuryFoot.jpg?resize=300%2C225&ssl=1

https://i1.wp.com/huntingboar.org/b/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/boarattackDogs.jpeg?resize=300%2C168&ssl=1

Go and see for yourself. Maybe Google should censor the organizers of boar versus dog and other animal fights on YouTube instead.

What a hypocrisy!

Nobody really knows for sure how many deadly wild boar are roaming our forests and environment. At first glance, penned pigs look rather inconspicuous, pink, floppy ears, rotund body, rolling in the dirt. They surely have very little in common with dangerous animals. Or do they?

 

Well, did you ever watch what happens when a dead or almost dead animal is thrown into a pig sty? If you did, you have had a glimpse at their secret nature, the traits of deadly wild boar.

And there are, of course, many news reports on attacks of boar on humans. Some exaggerate minor incidents, others report real boar attacks involving injuries to humans. As I explained in my previous article on the subject, boar attacks on humans are rare. Deadly attacks occur even less frequently.

However, those of us who grew up in areas with wild boar populations know either from direct experience or from accounts of friends and family members that sometimes only a fast retreat up a tree prevented a boar from injuring a person.

The most dramatic and almost incredible incident of a recent deadly boar attack involves a small sounder of boar and some ISIS fighters. The boar panicked obviously because of all the noise and commotion, fled and in the process killed several of the fighters.

How can that be?

First, we have to consider that true wild boar are large animals with a weird looking body. But be not mistaken, they can outrun any human and many other animals, they have a lightning fast start and acceleration before reaching a top speed of up to 30+miles per hour. No human has a chance to outsprint a boar. And water offers no protection either. Boar are good swimmers.

deadly wild boar

Boar ready to attack.  Note head position ready to strike upwards, and raised hackles.Time to retreat. (T-Online)

Male boar can grow around three to four feet in height and weigh considerably over 100 kilos (220 pounds). Some monster boar have tipped the scales at over 600 pounds.

Male boar have razor-sharp tusks they use to slash upwards and sideways. The tusks are responsible for injuries to the legs and thighs. Given enough time, a male boar can afflict enough injury to cause a person to bleed out.

deadly wild boar

Boar are most dangerous at the mating time which generally is from November to January. During that time, male boar are on the move and looking for mating partners. Hormones running high, they have to fend off other males competing for females. The result? Boar are jumpy and more prone to attack without much warning.

Injured boar also tend to skip the warning and engage in surprise attacks. Or in revenge attacks, if you want to say so. Male boar are most dangerous to humans when injured while females with piglets are to be avoided at all cost.

 

Notice to readers.

Google violates First amendment by “… abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press;”.

Google found pictures on this page in violation of their Adsense policies. Huh? The pictures Google is suppressing are found in Google search results and on very big websites. 

What our readers like or dislike is not Google’s business. And threatening the freedom of the press by blocking search results is out of bounds.

We need to be advertising alternatives to Google. Google is getting way too big and too influential.

We have removed the pictures Google eyes find offensive but list instead the URL of the picture for your information and use.

https://i2.wp.com/huntingboar.org/b/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/BoarAttackWoundDogimages.jpeg?w=259&ssl=1

Go and see for yourself. Maybe Google should censor the organizers of boar versus dog and other animal fights on YouTube instead.

Boar attack wound on dog.

Adult females, weigh in at between 40 (90 pounds) and 70 kilos (155 pounds). Their main weapon are not tusks, though they have some small ones, but a vicious bite. A boar can crush the femur and other major bones of the skeleton of a human with ease. A female boar attacks with her mouth wide open (like a crocodile) and bites decisively.

Female wild pigs are extremely dangerous when they lead piglets. Getting between a female and her piglets is like playing with fire. The female will defend her offspring with her life and ruthlessly.

Nevertheless, whenever possible, the female boar will warn you off before an attack. On the other hand, if a hunter or hiker surprises her and her piglets, she might attack without any warning at all. The danger of attacks with injuries is highest in late winter and early spring because wild hogs farrow at those times or have newborn piglets in a farrowing nest nearby.

Notice to readers.

Google violates First amendment by “… abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press;”.

Google found pictures on this page in violation of their Adsense policies. Huh? The pictures Google is suppressing are found in Google search results and on very big websites. 

What our readers like or dislike is not Google’s business. And threatening the freedom of the press by blocking search results is out of bounds.

We need to be advertising alternatives to Google. Google is getting way too big and too influential.

We have removed the pictures Google eyes find offensive but list instead the URL of the picture for your information and use.

 

https://i0.wp.com/huntingboar.org/b/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/BoarAttackInjuryFoot.jpg?resize=300%2C225&ssl=1

Advertisements

Go and see for yourself. Maybe Google should censor the organizers of boar versus dog and other animal fights on YouTube instead.

 

While true wild boar usually have only one litter per year with anywhere from five to over ten piglets, feral pigs more often than not have two litters. The number of piglets per litter is about the same. This is one reason why the number of wild pigs in the United States is growing so rapidly. The abundance of food is another one.

Hunters are aware of the potential dangers coming from boar and know how to avoid them. They are less likely to be attacked. Hikers and joggers are an entirely different story. They are oblivious to the potential danger associated with wild boar. And, more likely than not, pay less attention to their surroundings than hunters.

If they knew what to look for, they would also be safer. Boar, especially female boar in a sounder, give warning signs when they detect a danger. They also warn before attacking.

The lead female or other members of the sounder make a huffing or puffing sound when they perceive or detect a danger by forcefully blowing air through their nose. It is a warning to the intruder to stay away. Furthermore, it puts him on notice that he has been detected.

If huffing and puffing do not have the desired effect, the boar produce a grunting noise that tells the sounder to flee whenever possible. It also is a sow’s last warning to you to get lost or face the consequences. Given an option, wild hogs run away instead of attacking. The exception is a female with piglets.

Notice to readers.

Google violates First amendment by “… abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press;”.

Google found pictures on this page in violation of their Adsense policies. Huh? The pictures Google is suppressing are found in Google search results and on very big websites. 

What our readers like or dislike is not Google’s business. And threatening the freedom of the press by blocking search results is out of bounds.

We need to be advertising alternatives to Google. Google is getting way too big and too influential.

We have removed the pictures Google eyes find offensive but list instead the URL of the picture for your information and use.

content/uploads/2018/03/boarattackDogs.jpeg?resize=300%2C168&ssl=1

Go and see for yourself. Maybe Google should censor the organizers of boar versus dog and other animal fights on YouTube instead.

 

Boar normally make the warning sounds you would expect before they attack. However, if surprised or when you have come between a sow and her piglets, she will attack without warning. She will not flee but rather defend her progeny with her life.

How do hikers, joggers or walkers avoid to be attacked?

The simple answer is to be aware of your surroundings when strolling or running around in boar territory.

  • Stay on paths, do not go into dense vegetation and brambles. A sow may have her farrowing nest there.
  • Be noisy to let the wild pigs know that you are there. They most likely have already detected you by smell or hearing.
  • Don’t just traipse around in the forest or brush. Boar may live there and raise their young there.
  • When you hear boar huff, gave them a wide berth. They feel safer that way and will most likely leave you alone or flee.
  • When you hear the last warning grunt, it is high time for you to back away from the animals slowly. Make yourself as big as possible and go backward in a slow, smooth motion. Do not make sudden jerky movements or wave your arms around in an attempt to intimidate the sow. Otherwise, the wild pig will most likely react with an attack on you.
  • If all else fails, look for a tree that is easy to climb, go up the tree, and be prepared for a siege that can last a long time.
  • It is always better to retreat slowly when you see wild boar than to challenge them in their own territory. They can outrun you and crush your bones with one bite of their powerful jaws. However, they would rather not do so and run away to hide from you.

More about avoiding attacks and how to get away unharmed it in my next article.

Humans have hunted boar for food for centuries. The boar have learned to fear humans. They react to human presence accordingly if given a choice and a way out.

Wild pigs are the fourth intelligent animal we know. Thus, they are quick learners capable to learn from and adjust to almost any situation.

Never forget that and act accordingly.

PJJ

[/two_third]

Digiprove sealCopyright secured by Digiprove © 2018

pjj

Publisher and Editor in Chief at United Seabears
Peter Jaeckle is the publisher and Chief Editor of the California Hunting Post.You can find him also on Google+,Twitter, Facebook and on many other sites. Over the past decades he has written on investments, dogs and dog rescue, economic and on environmental topics.
pjj

Latest posts by pjj (see all)

Advertisements

One thought on “Deadly wild boar are exactly how deadly?”

  • KT

    March 27, 2018 at 3:47 pm

    And for some reason I still have this want and need to go hike in the hills with little piggys. Nice write up. Thank you for the great info. Need some of these story’s over at the jesses hunting site.

All original content on these pages is fingerprinted and certified by Digiprove